Best Resources for Rolfing

Kimberly Richey

Anne Marie Cockrell

Triangle Rolfing

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Rolfing, also known as Rolfing Structural Integration, is a form of holistic therapy that manipulates the connective tissues with the aim of restoring flexibility and revitalizing energy. The connective tissues are called fascia, which are fibrous tissue that line the entire body. Fascia maintains posture, balances compensations, allows for freedom of movement and keeps all the body parts together. Realigning and releasing restricted fascia can provide a deep healing effect on physical and emotional sense of well-being. It is thought that once Rolfing is performed, the body’s natural mechanisms take over and finish the job of correcting any imbalances. The benefits include increased energy in the body; relief from chronic pain and tension e.g. low back, hip and neck pain; rehabilitation for injury, accidents, and surgery; greater flexibility, range of motion and coordination; improved posture and performance; decreased anxiety and greater confidence. It is also beneficial for sciatica, frozen shoulder, repetitive strain injury (RSI), headaches, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ). Studies have reported rolfing to create a more efficient use of the muscles, allow the body to conserve energy, create more economical and refined patterns of movement, significantly reduce the spinal curvature of people with lordosis (sway back), and enhances neurological functioning. It is used by athletes, dancers, children, business professionals, and people from all walks of life. Rolfing is usually performed in a series of 10 sessions that follow a logical order, designed to address the root cause of the problem rather than providing a temporary fix.